Accessibility links

Nuland on U.S. - Russia Relations


U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Victoria Nuland

Since Russia's invasion of Crimea and then eastern Ukraine, it has become clear that Russia is unwilling "to abide by international law or live by the rules of the institutions that Russia joined at the end of the Cold War," said U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs Victoria Nuland.

Since Russia's invasion of Crimea and then eastern Ukraine, it has become clear that Russia is unwilling "to abide by international law or live by the rules of the institutions that Russia joined at the end of the Cold War," said U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for European and Eurasian Affairs Victoria Nuland.

To counter the threat posed by Russia’s aggression and deter any military moves against NATO territory, the United States and its NATO Allies have maintained a military presence on land, sea, and air along NATO’s eastern edge—in Poland, Romania, Bulgaria, and the three Baltic States. All 28 Allies have participated in exercises, training sessions, and patrols throughout Europe supported by the U.S.

To press Moscow to bring an end to the violence in Ukraine and fully implement its commitments under the Minsk agreements, the United States has worked with the European Union, the G7, and other like-minded nations to impose successive rounds of tough, economic sanctions on Russia over the past two years. These sanctions, combined with low oil prices and Russia’s continued structural weaknesses, have imposed significant costs.

The United States is working to increase the resilience of countries across Europe that face pressure from Russia. To help Ukraine better monitor and secure its borders, deploy its forces more effectively, and defend its sovereignty and territorial integrity, the United States has committed over $600 million in non-lethal security assistance.

The United States is also helping countries in Eastern Europe and Eurasia to strengthen their democratic institutions, reform their economies, and fight corruption. Energy diversification remains a key component in protecting vulnerable countries over dependence on Russian energy.

At the same time, the U.S. will continue to look for ways to work with Russia in areas of common interest, including non-proliferation, nuclear security, and counterterrorism.

Finally, the United States will continue to engage directly with those Russian businesses and individuals who share American interests and values. And the United States will continue to speak out against laws and policies that impede the work of Russian civil society and violate the fundamental rights of freedom of expression, assembly, and association in Russia and elsewhere in the region.

The United States will continue to strongly support its NATO allies while promoting freedom and democracy throughout Europe and Eurasia.

Your opinion

Show comments

XS
SM
MD
LG