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U.S. Supports Interim Government in Haiti


Haiti's outgoing President Michel Martelly delivers a goodbye salute to supporters in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Feb. 7, 2016.

The United States welcomes the agreement by Executive and Legislative branches in Haiti on a roadmap for governing the country until a new president is democratically elected.

The United States welcomes the agreement by Executive and Legislative branches in Haiti on a roadmap for governing the country until a new president is democratically elected.

The U.S. acknowledges the constructive role played by the Special Mission of the Organization of American States in fostering a spirit of consensus among Haitian stakeholders as the agreement was negotiated and finalized. The United States also echoes the Core Group statement of February 6, noting our wish “that all actors will keep the best interests of Haiti and its people above all other considerations.”

The immediate job of the interim president will be to quickly hold presidential elections, which under the agreement are scheduled to take place on April 24.

A presidential runoff due to be held last month was canceled after the second place finisher threatened to boycott the vote over allegations of fraud in the first round. Protesters took to the streets, and the perceived security environment deteriorated. Electoral intimidation, destruction of property, and violence run counter to Haiti’s democratic principles and laws.

The United States looks forward to continuing to work with Haiti and its international partners to further strengthen democracy in Haiti, reflective of the region’s collective commitments under the Inter American Democratic Charter. The April 24 elections will allow voters to participate in an electoral process that is transparent, credible, free of violence, and representative of the will of the Haitian people.

Once the electoral cycle is completed, the United States looks forward to working with Haiti to continue the progress it has made in the past few years, particularly in infrastructure, agriculture, health, economic opportunity, and institution building. Fully functioning democratic institutions will make progress in these areas easier and more long-lasting.

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