Security

Ten Ways To Help Fight Modern Slavery

“Around the world, as many as 27 million people are still victimized in human trafficking, or modern slavery."

“This scourge occurs everywhere in the world," said CdeBaca. “This scourge occurs everywhere in the world," said CdeBaca.
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“This scourge occurs everywhere in the world," said CdeBaca.
“This scourge occurs everywhere in the world," said CdeBaca.

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“Around the world, as many as 27 million people are still victimized in human trafficking, or modern slavery,” Luis CdeBaca, Ambassador-at-Large to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons at the U.S. Department of State, said on January 31st, the last day of National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month, 2013.


“This scourge occurs everywhere in the world.  . . . Here in the United States, nearly every state has some form of anti-trafficking legislation -- and Wyoming is poised soon to become the last state to criminalize modern slavery. The passage of this bill . . . is due in no small part to the work and advocacy of non-governmental organizations, victim service providers, legislators, and concerned citizens.”

Ambassador CdeBaca said there are 10 ways to help fight modern slavery:



Learn the red flags that may indicate human trafficking and ask follow up questions so that you can help identify a potential trafficking victim.

In the United States, call the National Human Trafficking Resource Center at 1-888-3737-888 to get help.


In the United States, call the National Human Trafficking Resource Center at 1-888-3737-888 to get help and connect with a service provider, report a tip with information on potential human trafficking activity; or learn more by requesting training, technical assistance, or resources.


Be a conscientious consumer. Check out the U.S. Department of Labor's List of Goods Produced by Child Labor or Forced Labor and find out how slavery touches your life by taking a short online survey at slaveryfootprint.org.


Incorporate human trafficking information into your professional associations' conferences, training manuals, and other materials as relevant.



Join or start a grassroots anti-trafficking coalition.



Meet with and/or write to your local, state, and federal government representatives to let them know that you care about combating human trafficking.



Distribute public awareness materials available from the Department of Health and Human Services or Department of Homeland Security.



Volunteer to do victim outreach or offer your professional services to a local anti-trafficking organization.



Donate funds or needed items to an anti-trafficking organization.



Encourage your local schools to partner with students and include the issue of modern day slavery in their curriculum.

You can find 10 more ways to help fight human trafficking in State’s fact sheet at: http://www.state.gov/j/tip/id/help/index.htm


As Ambassador CdeBaca said, “Take a stand for freedom.”
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