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Ghana's Strong Example


Ghanaian President John Kufuor traveled to Washington this week on an official state visit, marking the close and enduring ties of the two nations.

"Today, Ghana and America are still bound by our love of liberty, and we stand as one in our efforts to safeguard that freedom," President George Bush said at a White House ceremony greeting Mr. Kufuor and his wife. "Ghana and America stand as one as we work to secure freedom from poverty. Ghana's leaders are governing justly, fighting corruption and investing in their people."

The Ghana-U.S. relationship goes back to that nation's independence in 1957. America has encouraged both democratic and economic development in the West African nation, and commercial ties now total $600 million a year. Indeed, Mr. Kufuor noted at the ceremony that his country's enduring strength is its commitment to good governance and promotion of the private sector rather than government as the prime engine of economic growth.

Like the U.S., Ghana is in the middle of a lively election season as political parties there prepare for Mr. Kufuor to step down next year.

"Whatever the outcome," Mr. Bush said, "Ghana is showing Africa that democracy is not a challenge to be feared, but a sure path to prosperity and peace."
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