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Iraqi Parliament Sworn In


The two-hundred-seventy-five elected members of Iraq's parliament have been sworn in. They represent Iraqi Shias, Sunnis, Kurds, and other ethnic and religious groups. The next step is to form a new government.

That process may not be easy. Adnan Pachachi, the parliament's acting speaker, says Iraqis "have to prove to the world that a civil war will not take place among our people." He says, "The danger is still looming and the enemies are ready for us because they do not like to see a united, strong, stable Iraq." U.S. Ambassador to Iraq Zalmay Khalilzad says the best answer to terrorism is an Iraqi government with a good program, good ministers, and a good process for decision-making. President George W. Bush says, "Forming a new government will demand negotiation and compromise by Iraqis":

"It will require patience by America and our coalition allies. In the weeks ahead, Americans will likely see a good deal of political maneuvering in Iraq as different factions and leaders advance competing agendas and seek their share of political power. Out of this process, a free government will emerge that represents the will of the Iraqi people, instead of the will of one cruel dictator."

U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice says she believes "that like so many people who've gone through the trials of trying to build a democracy, the Iraqis are going to succeed. And," says Ms. Rice, "we should express confidence in them because every time they have been confronted with a challenge, going all the way back to the transfer of sovereignty in 2004, the Iraqis have faced up to that challenge and they have been able to move the next step ahead in the political process."

The preceding was an editorial reflecting the views of the United States Government.

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