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UN Mission Critical For Peace In South Sudan


United Nations peacekeepers patrol in the camp for displaced people inside the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) compound in Malakal, Upper Nile State, which is currently held by anti-government forces, March 4, 2014. REUTERS/Andrea Campeanu

The United Nations Mission in South Sudan – known as UNMISS - protects civilians and makes it possible for humanitarian aid to reach those in need.

The United States is working on many different fronts to end the political crisis in South Sudan, alleviate the suffering of the people there, and restore the troubled nation to peace and stability.



We have strongly supported the IGAD-led negotiations in Addis Ababa, pressed both sides to implement the January 23 Agreement on Cessation of Hostilities, and welcomed efforts underway by the African Union to ensure justice and accountability for atrocities and violations of human rights. With our support, the IGAD monitoring and verification mission will be able to do its important work of monitoring the cessation of hostilities agreement. We are also providing significant assistance to address the mounting humanitarian crises.

This week the United States announced an additional $83 million contribution to help Sudanese displaced within South Sudan and those who have fled into Uganda, Kenya, Ethiopia and Sudan.

The United Nations Mission in South Sudan – known as UNMISS - represents the international community there. UNMISS protects civilians and makes it possible for humanitarian aid to reach those in need. The United States strongly supports the work of UNMISS. We call on all parties to fully cooperate with it and allow it to do its work without interference. We call on the government of South Sudan to ensure that threats against UNMISS cease. We are very concerned that UNMISS facilities have come under fire in recent days, jeopardizing the lives of peacekeepers and displaced people sheltered there. These attacks must cease immediately. Those involved in the attacks, those who have raided UN and humanitarian warehouses and offices, and those who have killed workers delivering humanitarian aid must be held accountable.

The suffering has gone on too long. The world is waiting for all parties in the conflict to finally implement the Cessation of Hostilities Agreement they signed on January 23. The fighting must end now.
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