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A Half Billion Vaccines Donated


Boxes of Moderna coronavirus vaccine, donated by the U.S. government via the COVAX facility, after their arrival at the airport in Nairobi, Kenya. (File)

The United States has now donated over 500 million COVID-19 vaccine doses to more than 110 countries and economies around the world in partnership with COVAX.

A Half Billion Vaccines Donated
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President Biden has committed to sharing 1.2 billion COVID-19 vaccine doses with the world. March 17, the United States hit a significant milestone with in its global COVID-19 response. “The United States has now donated over 500 million COVID-19 vaccine doses to more than 110 countries and economies around the world in partnership with COVAX,” said Mary Beth Goodman, Acting Coordinator for Global COVID-19 Response and Health Security.

“This is in addition to the nearly $20 billion in COVID-19 health, humanitarian, economic and development assistance to over 120 countries, including rapid response support for urgent health needs and technical assistance to expand vaccine access.”

The success of the program is, in no small measure, the result of unprecedented coordination and collaboration with hundreds of partners around the world.

“We are working tirelessly with governments and international organizations, vaccine producers, NGOs, the private sector, and others to deliver vaccines, get shots in arms, increase testing and treatment, support and protect healthcare workers, and more – including through the COVID-19 Global Action Plan,” said Secretary of State Antony Blinken in a written statement.

Indeed, from acquiring the vaccines, to safely delivering them to hospitals and clinics, to getting shots in arms, the United States partners with global and regional organizations, including COVAX and the African Vaccine Acquisition Trust, and engages with local leaders and community organizations around the world. On the local level, the State Department has so far awarded over 100 small grants of up to $10,000 to fund innovative projects to address specific regional COVID-19 challenges.

And let there be no mistake, “These vaccines are safe, effective and donated free of cost,” said Acting Coordinator Goodman.

“The United States donates vaccines with one goal in mind--to save lives around the world. This pandemic is not over. It's absolutely essential to get a vaccine so that we prevent the next variant from affecting the world, as we've seen with previous delta and other common variants.”

“This work is critical because this pandemic is not over. Many lives are still at risk globally as countries contend with Omicron and we face the possibility of new variants,” said Secretary of State Blinken.

“The United State will continue to work with partners and communities at every level to save lives and better prepare for future pandemics.”

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