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Additional Aid To Ukraine


U.S. President Barack Obama, right, shakes hands with Ukraine president-elect Petro Poroshenko in Warsaw, Poland, June 4, 2014.

In their recent meeting, President Barack Obama and now inaugurated Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko discussed the importance of rooting out corruption, increasing transparency, and creating new models of economic growth.

In their recent meeting, President Barack Obama and now inaugurated Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko discussed the importance of rooting out corruption, increasing transparency, and creating new models of economic growth. They also discussed making sure that Ukraine becomes a more energy-efficient economy but also one that is less dependent solely on energy sources from Russia.

To support the Ukrainian Government in these efforts, the United States announced an additional $48 million in U.S. assistance. Pending Congressional notification, the additional aid will support Ukraine's efforts to carry out reforms needed to make its International Monetary Fund and World Bank programs successful and place the country on a path towards economic growth. It will assist with constitutional reforms, decentralization, and confidence-building measures, particularly in the East and South.

The assistance will strengthen Ukraine's State Border Guard Service, and bolster efforts of the government, civil society, and the private sector to fight corruption. And finally, it will help Ukraine diversify its trade and enhance its energy security.

At the recent G7 summit, member countries agreed to help Ukraine reduce its energy risks to include diversifying its supplies. The G7 is also going to help countries in Central and Eastern Europe strengthen their energy security.

Like so many Ukrainians, President Poroshenko wants to forge closer ties with Europe and the United States, but also recognizes that Ukraine will benefit from a constructive relationship with Russia. That's why "Russia needs to seize that opportunity," said President Obama. "Russia needs to recognize that [President] Poroshenko is the legitimately elected leader of Ukraine and engage the government in Kyiv."

Given its influence over the militants in Ukraine, said President Obama, "Russia continues to have a responsibility to convince them to end their violence, lay down their weapons, and enter into a dialogue with the Ukrainian government." On the other hand, if Russia’s provocations continue, the G7 nations are ready to impose additional costs on Russia.

The United States remains committed to supporting Ukraine's democratic reforms, economic development, and sovereignty and territorial integrity.
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