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Assisting Law Enforcement in Mexico


FILE - Police at a crime scene in Tijuana, Mexico.

Implemented through the Merida Initiative, a recently completed new course was aimed at training criminal investigators.

Four months after the official launch, Mexico’s Executive Secretariat of the National Public Security System, known as the SESNSP, marked the completion of the Instructor Training Course for Criminal Investigation under the New Accusatory Criminal Justice System. A ceremony was held recently at La Muralla Police and Forensics Training Centre of the federal Attorney General’s office. The course strengthens the technical and operational capabilities of law enforcement officers who are responsible for criminal investigations.

Implemented through the Merida Initiative, the course was jointly coordinated by the SESNSP and the Embassy of the United States in Mexico. It is part of a national program aimed at training criminal investigators in the accusatory criminal justice system.

Since the start of the course in July of this year, over 600 investigative police from Mexican state prosecutors’ offices, the Attorney General’s office, and the Anti-Kidnapping Unit have been trained as Instructors in Criminal Investigation. The training includes the core competencies that are fundamental for law enforcement and successful criminal prosecution, including proper procedures for detention or arrest of individuals, criminal analysis, and preservation of a crime scene and evidence. Graduates received a kit donated by the U.S. Embassy containing tools needed to complete a thorough investigation at the scene of a crime, which they will use to train other investigative police throughout Mexico.

Speaking during the ceremony on behalf of the Executive Secretary of the SESNSP, Deputy Executive Secretary Lázaro Gaytán Aguirre recognized U.S. government support for the program, emphasizing the importance of achieving consolidation of the accusatory criminal justice system and continuing efforts for professionalization and specialization of Mexican law enforcement.

Kyle Grimes, Senior Consultant for the International Criminal Investigative Training Assistance Program from the U.S. Embassy, underscored the importance of replicating the training for investigative police throughout Mexico to acquire the necessary skills that will enable them to meet their responsibilities under the new criminal justice system.

The United States is proud to partner with Mexico to help the brave men and women of law enforcement there better serve the Mexican people.

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