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Boosting U.S. Commitment To Peace In The C.A.R.


U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power speaks to IDP women at the makeshift camp where over 40,000 found refuge at the airport in Bangui, Central African Republic, Dec. 19, 2013.

The United States condemns the continued attacks by all armed groups against innocent civilians and against the African and French peacekeeping troops.

Fighting has continued in the Central African Republic, with sectarian violence flaring in and around the capital Bangui and in other areas of the country. The United States condemns the continued attacks by all armed groups against innocent civilians and against the African and French peacekeeping troops.


The December 19 visit to the C.A.R. by Samantha Power, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, and Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs Linda Thomas-Greenfield underscores our commitment to bring an end to the crisis and facilitate a political transition leading to credible elections as soon as possible.

As Ambassador Power said, “President Obama asked me to deploy here … to see how better we can support the African Union and the French, who have put their troops in harm’s way, who are carrying out these patrols with this new and improved civilian protection mandate.”

The Department of State welcomed the inauguration on December 19 of the African Union-led Stabilization Mission, known as MISCA, which is composed of troops from Burundi, Cameroon, Chad, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, and the Republic of the Congo. Toward this end, our nation is pledging up to $100 million to help support MISCA. The new U.S. funds will aid MISCA with planning and logistical support, non-lethal equipment and training.

The United States believes that MISCA, with the support of French troops, offers the best mechanism to help quickly address the ongoing violence and provide security to allow humanitarian assistance.

Chaos and violence have gripped the C.A.R. since last December, when the Seleka alliance began its rebellion, seizing power and removing then-President Bozize. Since then, the situation has become increasingly anarchic, with Seleka fighters killing, raping and pillaging, and Christian militias, known as anti-Balaka, forming in response to Seleka abuses.

International observers estimate that 400,000 people have been internally displaced and some 68,000 new refugees have fled in recent months to neighboring countries amid deplorable levels of violence and lawlessness.
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