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Diplomatic Opportunity With Iran Must Be Tested


General view prior to the start of the two days of closed-door nuclear talks on Tuesday, Oct. 15, 2013 in Geneva.

Representatives from Iran and the P5+1 nations are to meet November 7 and 8 in Geneva to continue discussions about Iran’s nuclear program.

Representatives from Iran and the P5+1 nations –- Britain, China, France, Russia, the U.S. and Germany -- are scheduled to meet November 7 and 8 in Geneva to continue discussions over international concerns about Iran’s nuclear program. Technical and sanctions experts met in Vienna October 30 and 31 to have detailed technical discussions. The first round of talks since Hassan Rouhani became Iran’s president took place in Geneva in mid -October, and were serious and substantive.


During a speech in Washington about the much-desired U.S. goal of moving toward a world without nuclear weapons, Secretary of State John Kerry said it is imperative that the United States put Iran to the test to see whether its nuclear program really is a peaceful one, and whether Iran “will submit to the standards of the international community:

“The idea that the United States of America as a responsible nation to all of humankind would not explore that possibility would be the height of irresponsibility and dangerous in itself.”
Our eyes are wide open. The actions must be real. They must be fully verifiable."


Secretary of State Kerry noted that the diplomatic path to a solution is not easy, and that a “mere statement you are willing to do something” does not mean it has been done:

“Our eyes are wide open. The actions must be real. They must be fully verifiable. They must get the job done. And no words can replace those actions. And we have made it crystal clear, and I will repeat again, no deal is better than a bad deal, because a bad deal could actually wind up creating greater danger.”

Mr. Kerry said that the United States “will do what is necessary. But it is important for everybody to remember that in a world with fewer nuclear weapons, every nation can actually be stronger, not weaker.”
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