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Kerry On U.S. - China Cooperation


U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (L) looks on as an engine is built during a tour of the Foton Cummins Engine plant in Beijing February 15, 2014. Kerry toured the plant and made remarks on climate change cooperation between the United States and China.

“We are committed to strengthening our enduring presence in this dynamic region, and to working with our partners in order to promote long term stability and prosperity."

“The United States takes our role in the Asia Pacific very seriously,” U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said in a recent trip to Beijing, China. “We are committed to strengthening our enduring presence in this dynamic region, and to working with our partners in order to promote long term stability and prosperity . . . And our partnership with China is critical to our effort to provide for that stability and prosperity.”

President Barack Obama had made clear when he met President Xi Jinping of China at Sunnylands in California in 2013, that they are committed to building an historic bilateral relationship based on two important elements: practical cooperation, and constructive management of differences.

“Our partnership with China . . . is one that is continuing to be defined,” Secretary Kerry said. “We are convinced that . . . [when] China and the United States can act together in concert with common purpose, [we] have the opportunity . . . to make a significant difference.”

After meeting with senior Chinese officials in Beijing, Secretary Kerry told reporters, “In our meetings. . . we spoke about the commitment that the United States and China share to achieve a denuclearized North Korea, as well as the special role that China can play in helping to make that goal a reality. We also discussed . . . climate change and clean energy. . . Together, the United States and China account for some 40 percent of the carbon pollution that is released into the atmosphere. It is imperative for us to work together in order to ensure that an ambitious international climate agreement . . . can be achieved.”

“Our cooperation . . . on issues of enormous importance in the world should not go unnoticed,” Secretary Kerry said in conclusion. “China and the United States are cooperating on big-ticket items - the P5+1 on Iran . . . Afghanistan . . . Syria . . . [and] South Sudan. . . It is important for us, as the two most powerful economies in the world, to look for opportunities . . . to work together . . . to manage the differences, but most importantly to engage in a practical cooperation that can have an influence on other countries.”
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