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U.S. Committed To NATO


NATO Summit in Chicago (file)

The United States affirms that NATO will remain a strong, flexible alliance capable of dealing with 21st century challenges.

The United States affirms that NATO will remain a strong, flexible alliance capable of dealing with 21st century challenges. “I've made it a priority . . . . as part of our defense strategy, . . . . to emphasize the importance of strengthening our alliances and partnerships throughout the world,” said Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta as he began his trip to meet with our Allies across the Atlantic.


“Our European allies. . . . are the most capable and closest military partners that the United States has, bar none. And with Afghanistan and Libya, I think we've all seen how crucial that alliance can be in the 21st century.”

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, or NATO, is a mutual defense-based alliance that grew out of the World War II transatlantic alliance. Over the decades NATO has grown to include 28 Allies, partners with numerous non-Allied countries across the globe, and has renewed its strategic concept so that it can best ensure Allied security in an era of both traditional and emerging threats. The United States, which just hosted the most recent NATO Summit in Chicago, views this alliance as a cornerstone of its security policy. As the United States looks to guarantee its security in the decades to come, it will continue to do so in concert with its NATO Allies across the Atlantic, as it has done since 1949.

In Secretary Panetta’s words, “the key to that is going to be in strengthening the alliances and partnerships that we have. NATO is a model for that kind of partnership and alliance. It goes back to World War II, just after World War II. It is the strongest alliance we have. And it has been incredible in coming together and working with us.”
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