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Welcome Mediation Begins In Sudan Crisis


Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta, left, Ethiopian Prime Minister, Hailemariam Desalegn, middle right, and Somalian President, Hassan Sheikh Mohamud, right, after the IGAD meeting.

Leaders from Kenya and Ethiopia have laid the groundwork for a possible end to the violence and ethnic targeting raging in South Sudan.

Leaders from Kenya and Ethiopia have laid the groundwork for a possible end to the violence and ethnic targeting raging in South Sudan, meeting with President Salva Kiir to encourage peace talks with former Vice President Reik Macher.

The United States urges both sides to cease hostilities and begin mediated political talks.
Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn and Uhuru Kenyatta, the president of Kenya, flew to the capital Juba on December 26 to meet with the president and encourage dialogue. No deadline was set for beginning talks between the two sides, but further discussions to encourage negotiations are to be held in Nairobi, Kenya, by representatives of other nations in the region.


United Nations officials estimate that more than 1,000 people may have been killed since fighting erupted there this month, and any negotiations to end the violence dividing the country would be welcome.

The United States urges both sides to cease hostilities and begin mediated political talks. Implementing a cease-fire will give aid groups access to people in dire need of assistance. It will also send a strong signal to the citizens of South Sudan and the world that the nation’s leaders have the courage to accept compromise and work for the best interests of all South Sudanese people. Violence today will not pave the way for a more stable or prosperous tomorrow.
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