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Elections Key To Ending Political Deadlock In Nepal


Nepalese people stand in a line outside a polling station to cast their votes during the Constituent Assembly Election in Bhaktapur November 19, 2013. Nepal started voting on Tuesday to elect a special assembly which will draft a constitution aimed at en

The polls have closed and the votes are being counted in Nepal, where millions of citizens cast ballots on Nov. 19 for a new Constituent Assembly.

The polls have closed and the votes are being counted in Nepal, where millions of citizens cast ballots on Nov. 19 for a new Constituent Assembly. Given the mountainous nation’s many remote polling stations, final election results are expected to take at least a week. Nepal’s Election Commission reports a record turnout of 70 percent and international observer missions noted that the elections were well-conducted.


As the returns come in, the United States urges patience, non-violence and respect for the democratic process. Additionally, we encourage swift and transparent adjudication of any election-related complaints. Politicians and candidates alike should listen to the voice of the people. Successful elections like these are important not only for the Nepalese people, but for those around the world trying to rebuild from conflict through democratic means.

Tuesday’s balloting was a vital step in the peace process that ended Nepal’s bloody civil war in 2006. Once seated, the lawmakers will not only pick a new government but also draft a long-delayed constitution. We look forward to the formation of an assembly that will enact a constitution that reflects the aspirations of Nepal’s diverse population and will pass legislation that upholds human rights and democratic processes, and leads to economic prosperity.
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