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Strong Commitment To Democracy In The Maldives


A Maldivian woman casts her vote in Male, Maldives, Sept. 7, 2013.

Voters in Maldives head to the polls on September 28 for a run-off election to choose a new president.

Voters in Maldives head to the polls on September 28 for a run-off election to choose a new president. The island nation’s former leader, Mohamed Nasheed will face Abdullah Yameen after neither candidate was able to secure a majority of votes in a four-way preliminary contest September 7.

The United States congratulates the Maldivian people on concluding the first
round of voting.
The United States congratulates the Maldivian people on concluding the first round of voting, described by independent observers as open and largely peaceful. With an estimated turnout of 88 percent, the people of Maldives demonstrated a strong commitment to democratic government.

Tensions have been high in Maldives since members of the police and armed forces forced Nasheed, the first democratically elected leader since the nation’s independence, to step down a year and a half ago. His removal sparked protests, and the record voter turnout suggests Maldivians were eager to end their country’s political uncertainty.

As the country prepares for the run-off election later this month, the United States calls on all parties to respect the democratic process and continue to allow for a free, fair and peaceful vote to take place. This marks the second presidential election since Maldives embraced multiparty democracy in 2008, and so represents an historic opportunity for its citizens to select the leader of their choice.
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