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Nuclear Summit Achievements


U.S. President Barack Obama (C), U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (L) and Kazakhstan's President Nursultan Nazarbayev talk after posing for a family picture with other leaders during the Nuclear Security Summit in The Hague (March 25, 2014.)

The recently concluded Nuclear Security Summit in The Hague has helped reduce the threat of nuclear proliferation and terrorism by helping to secure nuclear sites and eliminating vast supplies of highly enriched uranium.

The recently concluded Nuclear Security Summit in The Hague has helped reduce the threat of nuclear proliferation and terrorism by helping to secure nuclear sites and eliminating vast supplies of highly enriched uranium.

In particular, Belgium and Italy have completely removed their excess supplies of highly-enriched uranium and plutonium.

In a major commitment, Japan announced that it will work with the United States to eliminate hundreds of kilograms of weapons-usable material from one of their experimental reactors, which would be enough for a dozen nuclear weapons.

Dozens of other nations have taken specific steps towards improving nuclear security in their own countries and to support global efforts.

The United States and Kazakhstan expressed a shared commitment to nonproliferation and nuclear security. Both countries agreed to continue to strengthen the physical security on the former Semipalatinsk Test Site.

The United States will also continue to help Kazakhstan prevent illicit trafficking in nuclear and radiological materials.

Both countries will continue to work together to convert Kazakhstan’s remaining highly enriched uranium reactors to low enriched uranium fuel and eliminate all remaining highly enriched uranium research reactor fuel as soon as technically feasible.

The Nuclear Security Summit, said President Obama, "has not just been talk, it's been action." Since the first summit was held in 2010, 12 countries and two dozen nuclear facilities around the world have rid themselves entirely of highly-enriched uranium and plutonium. Dozens of nations have boosted security at their nuclear storage sites; built their own counter-smuggling teams; or created new centers to improve nuclear security and training. The International Atomic Energy Agency is stronger. More countries have ratified the treaties and international partnerships at the heart of our efforts.

The next summit will be held in the United States in 2016. It is time to accelerate our efforts, over the next two years, said President Obama, so that the threat of nuclear proliferation and terrorism becomes a thing of the past.
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