Accessibility links

Busby On Human Rights In Vietnam


Deputy Assistant Secretary of State Scott Busby

“Without progress on human rights, there are limits to the level of development Vietnam can achieve and how far our bilateral relationship can expand.”

Representatives of the Vietnamese community from around the United States and Canada joined together in Washington recently to call for improvements in human rights in Vietnam.

The event marked the 20th anniversary of the U.S. Congress’ designation of May 11th as Vietnam Human Rights Day, a day to highlight the U.S. support for freedom of expression, freedom of association, freedom of religion, and other fundamental human rights for the people of Vietnam.

“This commemoration comes at a very important time in our relationship with Vietnam,” said U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary for Democracy, Human Rights and Labor Scott Busby:

“The bilateral relationship is growing, and as President Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry have underscored, human rights is an integral component of that relationship.”

Deputy Assistant Secretary Busby noted that Vietnam has made progress on human rights, including the release of political prisoners, the signing of the U.N. Convention Against Torture, further engagement with international NGOs, and increased Protestant church congregation registrations.

The United States welcomes these steps, and has encouraged the Vietnamese government to make further progress to protect human rights. The U.S. government has called on Vietnam to reform its national security legislation, which is ostensibly used to arrest individuals who criticize the government or express political views, both online and offline. Deputy Assistant Secretary Busby also called for respect of the rule of law, freedom of expression and respect for the rights of vulnerable peoples, religious freedom and labor rights. Mr. Busby noted that the U.S. Government would be raising its concerns with the Government of Vietnam during the annual U.S.-Vietnam human rights dialogue taking place the following week:

“Without progress on human rights, there are limits to the level of development Vietnam can achieve and how far our bilateral relationship can expand.”

“This has been a consistent part of our policy towards Vietnam,” said Mr. Busby, “And it will continue to be so, because the people of Vietnam deserve that much.”
XS
SM
MD
LG