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Democracy In Thailand


Thai people queue up at a polling center to vote in Thailand's general election in Bangkok, Thailand, July 3, 2011.

Recent parliamentary elections in Thailand demonstrated the Thai people’s strong desire to consolidate stability and democracy in the Southeast Asian nation.

With a strong voter turnout and peaceful balloting, the recent parliamentary elections in Thailand demonstrated the Thai people’s strong desire to consolidate stability and democracy in the Southeast Asian nation. The United States congratulates the people of the Kingdom of Thailand, our long-time friend and ally, for their participation in the elections.

The choice of who will lead Thailand now rests with the representatives elected by the voters. While the results are expected to be certified in the next week, preliminary returns show that the opposition Puea Thai Party commanded an outright majority of seats and, with an expected coalition with some smaller political parties, should be in a good position to pursue programs of economic development and political reconciliation.

Meanwhile, the nation's outgoing defense minister, General Prawit Wongsuwan, said the armed forces have accepted the election results and will not interfere as Ms. Yingluck Shinawatra, who as head of the Puea Thai is expected to become Prime Minister, forms a government. Amid the divisions that have roiled Thai politics in recent years, that pledge is a positive sign.

The United States looks forward to working with the next Thai government to broaden and strengthen our alliance, which is based on shared values and mutual respect. We also look forward to engaging with others such as the political opposition and civil society, as we have always done.

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