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Liberia's Election Should Proceed


Staff organize ballot boxes and election materials as they are brought in from polling stations after counting at a National Election Commission warehouse in Monrovia, Liberia, October 12, 2011.

The CDC's charge that the first-round balloting last month was fraudulent is unsubstantiated.

Liberians head to the polls again this week to elect a president in the first locally organized balloting since the end of the nation's bitter civil war. The United States is deeply disappointed then that a major political party, the Congress for Democratic Change, or CDC, is turning its back on the effort and all that it represents by deciding to boycott the voting.

The CDC's charge that the first-round balloting last month was fraudulent is unsubstantiated. As evidenced by both international and Liberian monitors, the October 11th presidential and legislative voting was free, fair and transparent.

The U.S. is totally supportive of moving forward with the November 8 election, as called for by the National Election Commission. Participation in elections is a fundamental part of democracy. We commend all Liberians for their peaceful participation in the first-round voting and encourage them to exercise their political voice again.

The United States commends the leadership of the Economic Community of West African States, we note the important contributions of the United Nations mission to Liberia in promoting security during the electoral period and for working with all sides and all parties to protect the integrity of Liberia's democracy. The international community, including the United States, will again send observers to monitor the election process. Resorting to violence is unacceptable.

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