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Obama And Kerry On Egypt Violence


Egyptian army soldiers take their positions on top and next to their armored vehicles while guarding an entrance to Tahrir square, in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, Aug. 16, 2013. Egypt is bracing for more violence after the Muslim Brotherhood called for nationwid

The United States strongly condemns the violence perpetrated by Egypt’s armed forces against civilians.

The United States strongly condemns the violence perpetrated by Egypt’s armed forces against civilians.


Secretary of State John Kerry called on all Egyptians to step back, calm the situation and avoid further loss of life.

“The interim government and the military, which together possess the preponderance of power in this confrontation, have a unique responsibility to prevent further violence and to offer constructive options for an inclusive, peaceful process across the entire political spectrum. This includes amending the constitution, holding parliamentary and presidential elections, which the interim government itself has called for.

“All of the other parties – all of the opposition, all of civil society, all parties – also share a responsibility to avoid violence and to participate in a productive path towards a political solution. There will not be a solution through further polarization. There can only be a political solution by bringing people together with a political solution.”

This is a pivotal moment for all Egyptians. The path towards violence leads only to greater instability, economic disaster, and suffering. The only sustainable path for either side is one towards a political solution.

“The cycle of violence and escalation needs to stop,” said President Barack Obama. “We call on the Egyptian authorities to respect the universal rights of the people. We call on those who are protesting to do so peacefully and condemn the attacks that we’ve seen by protesters,” he said.

“The relationship between the United States and Egypt goes back decades. It’s rooted in our respect of Egypt as a nation, an ancient center of civilization and a cornerstone for peace in the Middle East. It’s also rooted in our ties to the Egyptian people, forged through a long-standing partnership.

“So in the spirit of mutual interest and mutual respect, I want to be clear that America wants to partner in Egyptian people’s pursuit of a better future. And we are guided by our national interest in this long-standing relationship.

“America cannot determine the future of Egypt. That’s a task for the Egyptian people. We don’t take sides with any particular party or political figure,” said President Obama. But we will “work with all those in Egypt and around the world who support a future of stability that rests on a foundation of justice and peace and dignity.”
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