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Second U.S. - India Strategic Dialogue


U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, second right, shows appreciation after watching a performance by the Indian classical dancers at Kalakshetra in Chennai, India, July 20, 2011.

The partnership between the world’s two largest democracies covers issues ranging from counterterrorism and defense cooperation to climate change, high-tech trade, and scientific innovation.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was in India for the opening of the second round of the U.S.-India Strategic Dialogue. The partnership between the world’s two largest democracies covers issues ranging from counterterrorism and defense cooperation to climate change, high-tech trade, and scientific innovation. Secretary Clinton and Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh emphasized their commitment to shared values including pluralism, tolerance, openness, and respect for fundamental freedoms and human rights.

With regard to trade and investment, the United States is pleased to be one of India's largest trading partners and direct investors. Both countries have committed to do more to reduce barriers, open their markets, and find new opportunities for economic partnership.

On the matter of security cooperation, there has been progress. Both countries are allies in the fight against violent extremist networks. That's why the U.S. and India signed the Counterterrorism Cooperative Initiative to increase cooperation on the investigation of crimes, law enforcement, border management and cyber security.

The U.S. and India also stressed that success in Afghanistan and regional and global security requires elimination of safe havens and infrastructure for terrorism and violent extremism in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Maritime security is also a major concern, as both countries seek to protect sea lanes, combat piracy, and defend freedom of navigation. The U.S. applauds India's efforts to fight piracy in the Indian Ocean.

With regard to defense technologies, said Secretary Clinton, the United States expects to continue developing and selling the world's most competitive products. "We view these sales as important on their own terms," she said, "but also as a means to facilitate the work that the Indian and American militaries can do together."

The U.S.-India civil nuclear agreement has been a joint investment by both countries in the field of civil nuclear energy. For it to be successful, India needs to ensure a level playing field for U.S. companies seeking to enter the Indian nuclear energy sector.

"The cooperation [the United States and India] are forging here," said Secretary Clinton, "should build habits of cooperation and bonds of trust as we strive to make both of our countries stronger, more prosperous, and better equipped to address the challenges we face."

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