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U.S. - Poland Reaffirm Friendship


Poland's Foreign Minister Radoslaw Sikorski (left) and U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Poland's Foreign Minister Radoslaw Sikorski met in Washington in early March to discuss future and present cooperation.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Poland's Foreign Minister Radoslaw Sikorski met in Washington in early March to discuss future and present cooperation between the two countries.

Secretary Clinton and Foreign Minister Sikorski honed in on three essential areas: strengthening mutual security, expanding prosperity and economic cooperation, and promoting democracy.

On strengthening mutual security, the two discussed plans for a U.S. air detachment in Poland and European missile defense.

Secretary Clinton and Foreign Minister Sikorski also discussed ways Poland and the United States could work together to build greater prosperity in the two countries. Before the meeting, a Memorandum of Understanding on Cooperation in Clean and Efficient Energy was signed by our two governments.

"As we grow our military partnership, we continue to expand economic ties between the Polish and American people, particularly in the area of energy," said Secretary of State Clinton:

"Our two countries signed a memorandum of understanding to enhance cooperation in developing clean and efficient energy technologies. This and other energy initiatives will expand economic opportunities for both our people and the Polish people and reduce Poland’s and Europe’s dependence on any one source of energy."

The Memorandum of Understanding calls upon the United States and Poland to exchange information and cooperate on policies that support clean energy development such as clean coal technologies, energy efficiency, renewable energy, civilian nuclear energy, as well as environmental and waste management.

The Secretary and Foreign Minister also discussed the situation of emerging democracies around the world today, and agreed to expand the U.S.-Poland Strategic Dialogue to include a "Democracy Dialogue." They agreed that Poland, because of its history, has a unique and important experience to share with those struggling to build democracies today.

Since the days of Solidarity and the movement for democracy of the 1980s, the Polish people have known that no country can be fully secure and prosperous unless its people have a voice in their own affairs, said Secretary Clinton. "And in just two decades, Poland has built a transparent and representative government with a vital vibrant civil society" that today serves as a model for others.

"We look forward to growing our security cooperation, creating more economic opportunities," she said, "and keeping our longstanding friendship and our devotion to democracy forever vibrant."

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